Digital Barriers2008-03-12 11:22:37

New Security Imaging Technology Can 'See' Explosives Hidden Under Clothing

Unique security imaging technology that can 'see' explosives, liquids, narcotics, weapons, plastics and ceramics hidden under clothing from 25 metres will be unveiled at the Home Office Scientific Development Branch (HOSDB) Exhibition on 12 & 13 March 2008.

Developed by ThruVision Ltd, a spin out company of the Science and Technology Facility Council Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), the T5000 passive terahertz imaging system is set to drastically improve security at high profile sites and uniquely, at outdoor venues such as sporting arenas.

The only commercially available camera of its kind in the world, the T5000 can image both metallic and non-metallic threat objects hidden under clothing on still or moving subjects without revealing any body detail. Compact, rugged, portable, easy-to-use and completely safe, it can be used both indoors and outdoors up to a distance of 25m. Operating well beyond the range of traditional X-ray scanning and metal detector systems, the T5000 is designed for the protection of human life and property at key political, business, tourist and economic infrastructure sites. It delivers a powerful new capability for security personnel at international airports, public transport facilities, large sporting events, check point control installations and other high-security points of interest.

ThruVision's passive imaging technology stems from a collaborative European Space Agency (ESA) project which was based on original research carried out over many years by UK astronomers, including those at the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory to study dying stars. The T5000 operates in the terahertz region of the electromagnetic spectrum - frequently this region of the spectrum is referred to with terms such as Terahertz rays, or T-rays. T-rays are a form of low level energy naturally emitted from all materials, including rocks, plants, animals and people. They can pass through smoke, clouds and many solid materials like clothing, and in some cases, even walls.
The T5000 passively collects these naturally occurring T-rays and processes them to form images that reveal concealed objects hidden under a person's clothing without displaying physical body detail and without subjecting them to any of the harmful radiation associated with traditional X-ray security screening.

Clive Beattie, ThruVision's CEO said: 'Acts of terrorism have shaken the world in recent years and security precautions have been tightened globally. The T5000 dramatically extends the security surveillance envelope for ThruVision's passive body scanning products used at important sites and events. The ability to see both metallic and non-metallic items on people out to 25m is certainly a key capability that will enhance any comprehensive security system deployment.'

Dr Liz Towns-Andrews, Director of Knowledge Exchange at STFC said: 'Astronomers use T-ray cameras that can see through dust and clouds in space, revealing what lies beyond. ThruVision uses them to see weapons hidden by clothing. This is a first-class example of how fundamental scientific research can be applied to benefit the whole of society. Who would have imagined that research carried out by space scientists to study the stars could result in it being used to protect the public from terrorists and therefore save lives? The impact of this will be remarkable. '

Central Laboratory Innovation and Knowledge Transfer Limited (‘CLIK') is the wholly-owned technology exploitation company of the Science & Technology Facilities Council. CLIK has the exclusive rights to the commercial exploitation of STFC's intellectual property at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in Oxfordshire, the Daresbury Laboratory (DL) in Cheshire and the Astronomy Technology Centre (ATC) in Edinburgh. Working closely with the technical inventors, the CLIK team progresses individual projects through various business models to the point of implementation as commercial licenses or spin-out companies.

Science and Technology Facilities Council
The Science and Technology Facilities Council ensures the UK retains its leading place on the world stage by delivering world-class science; accessing and hosting international facilities; developing innovative technologies; and increasing the socio-economic impact of its research through effective knowledge exchange partnerships.

The Council has a broad science portfolio including Astronomy, Particle Physics, Particle Astrophysics, Nuclear Physics, Space Science, Synchrotron Radiation, Neutron Sources and High Power Lasers. In addition the Council manages and operates three internationally renowned laboratories:

• The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire
• The Daresbury Laboratory, Cheshire
• The UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Edinburgh

The Council gives researchers access to world-class facilities and funds the UK membership of international bodies such as the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL), European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), the European organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (ESO) and the European Space Agency (ESA). It also contributes money for the UK telescopes overseas on La Palma, Hawaii, Australia and in Chile, and the MERLIN/VLBI National Facility, which includes the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory.

The Council distributes public money from the Government to support scientific research. Between 2007 and 2008 it will invest approximately £678 million.

For more information contact:
Enterprise House
1-2 Hatfields
London
SE1 9PG
United Kingdom
Tel:     +44 (0) 207 940 4740






 

 


Email: info@worldsecurity-index.com By using worldsecurity-index.com you are agreeing to our Conditions of Use.
© KNM Media Kent Ltd 2022. All rights reserved.